Tag Archives: economy Blog

How the Internet is Further Concentrating the Wealth of the World

The internet has been the great disrupter for over 20 years now. But the greatest effects of the worldwide network we’ve come to depend on are yet to be seen. This article points to one — and it’s a big one. In the borderless world that the tech companies have created — a virtual, but no less real one — is a new economy being built by lives that are lived on devices. And this economy is funneling real money in ways that we may not have expected or want. Check out how the success of Pokemon Go illustrates some economic realities that we’re dealing with today.

Read full article: http://cnb.cx/29BadMX

The Mobile Challenge and Opportunity

Everyone is talking about the shift to mobile devices. We can expect changes in the way business is done and how people get information as smartphones and tablets continue to proliferate. This article points to three strategic problems that businesses must solve as  workforces become more mobile.

Just as the internet fundamentally changed consumer behaviour and the way we do business in the 1990s, the continued rise of mobile is set to be a major disruptive force over the next decade … That is backed up by a recent Gartner survey of 2,000 chief information officers (CIOs) worldwide, with 70% putting mobile top of the list ahead of other trends such as big data, social media and cloud computing as the technology that will disrupt established business models most for the next 10 years.

There are many benefits, mostly economic, that will drive the spread of mobile technology. In our own businesses, it’s a good time to develop strategies to meet our customers and partners when they’re on the go.

Read full article: http://linkd.in/130cV6a

Apps vs Browsers? No Contest. It’s Apps!

When apps — you know, those little applications that run on smartphones and tables? —  first came out a few years ago, a debate arose over which were better, apps or mobile websites, and which consumers would prefer. Developers thought that offering tailored services through a browser was much more desirable, from both cost and usability standpoints, rather than apps, which users had to update constantly, and that developers would have to maintain for several platforms. But consumers, hands down, have chosen apps. There’s something about these little one-trick ponies that are so easy to use that people like.

In this recent report from Flurry, a mobile analytics and advertising platform, it’s clear that apps command the most time spent on mobile devices by a whopping 4-to-1 ratio, and therefore are something consumers want.

Today, the U.S. consumer spends an average of 2 hours and 38 minutes per day on smartphones and tablets. 80% of that time (2 hours and 7 minutes) is spent inside apps and 20% (31 minutes) is spent on the mobile web. Apps (and Facebook) are commanding a meaningful amount of consumers’ time. All mobile browsers combined … control 20% of consumers’ time. Gaming apps remain the largest category of all apps with 32% of time spent. Facebook is second with 18%, and Safari is 3rd with 12% Worth noting is that a lot of people are consuming web content from inside the Facebook app. For example, when a Facebook user clicks on a friend’s link or article, that content is shown inside its web view without launching a native web browser, which keeps the user in the app. So if we consider the proportion of Facebook app usage that is within their web view,  we can assert that Facebook has become the most adopted browser in terms of consumer time spent.

The article covers several more interesting points about apps, but the take-away is, it’s time to think about how we can use apps to best server our customers, and explore what other economies can apps provide. People are using them, so offering them will become a differentiator in the burgeoning mobile world.

Read full article: [no longer available]

What’s Up Asia

We’ve all heard that Asia is the world’s up-and-coming economic force. But have we heard anything about how Asians see themselves in the world economy? Mark Hurst, who writes the Creative Good newsletter and recently returned from a lengthy trip to Southeast Asia, offers a few very interesting observations that should remind us that, if it’s true that market leaders generally stop innovating and become stagnant, the same can also be true for nations. Says Mark,

It’s hard to overestimate the feeling of energy, expansion, investment, and activity that pervades the region. As the US economy stagnates, money has flooded into southeast Asia trying to find better investment yield – and the aggressive work ethic of the region (long hours, highly competitive, focus on results) has been happy to make use of that investment.

Multiple times people told me, in effect, that they just don’t pay much attention to what’s happening in the US – or Europe, for that matter. Asia is taking the lead in the world economy and while the US has some good ideas worth studying (and perhaps borrowing and improving upon), it is not considered the leader to be followed.

Makes one wonder, can Americans imagine what the world’s economic landscape will look like in 20 years? In 10 years? And are these seismic shifts simply inevitable?

In case you’re not familiar with Creative Good and their work in the area of customer experience you can learn more, and subscribe to Mark’s newsletter here: http://goodexperience.com